Hire in Poland
with Confidence

Our hiring guide to Poland covers everything you need to know before expanding operations into one of Europe’s fastest-growing economies. With a well-educated, relatively low-cost workforce and a favorable geographical location, you’ll find talented employees or independent contractors at the ready.

Poland
Capital City
Warszawa
Local Time
CET (UTC+01:00)
Currency
Polish Zloty (PLN)
Official Language(s)
Polish
Population
37.96 Million (Dec 20)
Economic Region
European Union
GDP
594 Billion USD (Dec 20)
GDP Growth rate
5.3% (Sep 21)

To help you navigate Poland’s employment, tax, and compliance laws, Worksuite acts as your global employment partner, making it easy to hire employees or independent contractors—all without needing to set up your business entity.

– Quickly find, hire, and onboard talent in Poland without setting up your entity
Prevent expensive legal, contractual, or tax mistakes in India
– Manage contracts, payroll, and global tax forms all in one Worksuite

We simplify hiring in Poland by acting as the Employer of Record (EOR) or Global Agent of Record (AOR) on your behalf, handling everything from contracts, onboarding, documentation, payroll, benefits, and workforce management. Reduce your time-to-hire by 90%, slash your overheads, and remain fully compliant. Hiring workers in Poland has never been so easy.

Insights Into Poland

Poland has become an attractive center for global investment and operations in Europe, making it a prime location for businesses looking to expand their footprint across Central and Eastern European markets. Combined with a lower cost of living and a rapidly rising pool of professional talent, Poland is one of the best places to hire employees or freelancers fit for the job.

Worksuite Insights

Ease of Hiring Employees Very Easy
Ease of Hiring Independent Contractors Very Easy
Average Time-to-Hire Up to 4 Weeks
Labor Laws Complex
Regulatory Risk Low Risk

Employment stats

  • Employee Dismissal Periods

    2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months

  • Popular Contractor Agreements

    B2B Contract - Civil Law Agreement

  • Popular Employment Contracts

    Full-time Employment Contract
    Cooperation of Employment Contract

  • Popular Work Permit Types

    Type A

  • Payroll frequency

    Monthly

  • Cost of Employment

    19.48% - 22.14% Employer Tax

  • Tax Rates

    19% Corporate Tax
    32% Personal Income Tax
    23% VAT

  • Retirement Age (Average)

    Men 65yo, Women 60yo

  • Unemployment Rate

    5.4%

Average Salary vs Cost of Living (Per month)

In Polish Złoty (PLN)

Poland compared to other countries in the region

Country

Ease of Hiring Employees

Ease of Hiring Independent Contractors

Average Time-to-Hire

Labor Laws

Regulatory Risk

Country

Ease of Hiring Employees

Very Easy

Ease of Hiring Independent Contractors

Very Easy

Average Time-to-Hire

Up to 4 Weeks

Labor Laws

Complex

Regulatory Risk

Low Risk

3 Highest countries

Country

Ease of Hiring Employees

Very Easy

Ease of Hiring Independent Contractors

Very Easy

Average Time-to-Hire

Up to 4 Weeks

Labor Laws

Complex

Regulatory Risk

Low Risk

Country

Ease of Hiring Employees

Very Easy

Ease of Hiring Independent Contractors

Very Easy

Average Time-to-Hire

Up to 4 Weeks

Labor Laws

Complex

Regulatory Risk

Low Risk

Country

Ease of Hiring Employees

Very Easy

Ease of Hiring Independent Contractors

Very Easy

Average Time-to-Hire

Up to 4 Weeks

Labor Laws

Complex

Regulatory Risk

Low Risk

3 Lowest countries

Ease of Hiring Employees

Normal

Ease of Hiring Independent Contractors

Hard

Average Time-to-Hire

Up to 4 Weeks

Labor Laws

Complex

Regulatory Risk

High Risk

Country

Ease of Hiring Employees

Very Easy

Ease of Hiring Independent Contractors

Very Easy

Average Time-to-Hire

Up to 4 Weeks

Labor Laws

Complex

Regulatory Risk

Low Risk

Country

Ease of Hiring Employees

Very Easy

Ease of Hiring Independent Contractors

Very Easy

Average Time-to-Hire

Up to 4 Weeks

Labor Laws

Complex

Regulatory Risk

Low Risk

Minimum wage (per month)

3 Highest countries

702
poland
Poland
0
germany
Germany
0
united-kingdom
United Kingdom

Other countries

0
croatia
Croatia
0
czech-republic
Czechia
0
slovakia
Slovakia
0
austria
Austria

3 Lowest countries

0
sweden
Sweden
0
united-kingdom
United Kingdom
0
germany
Germany

Employee vs. Independent Contractor Classification in Poland

Any business hiring in Poland should understand the important legal distinction between who classifies as an independent contractor, and who can be hired as an employee. Fines or penalties may be issued to businesses who are hiring contractors under the guise of employment. It is important to work with a partner like Worksuite to ensure a compliant engagement framework that accurately classifies freelancers as independent contractors for you and lets you know when freelance talent must be engaged as a payrolled contractor or employed directly. Common talent classification factors weighed in Poland include:

  • What degree of control and supervision does the company have over the worker?
  • Who provides equipment, work space, amenities, internet, etc.?
  • What is the nature of the relationship, and how long is the period of work?
  • Do both parties have the authority to terminate cooperation?
  • Has a contractor independently established their business?

Understanding the distinctions between employees and independent contractors is critical to compliantly engaging workers in Poland.

Factors

Employee

Independent Contractor

Employment Laws

Governed by The Polish Labour Code.

Civil law contracts regulated by the Civil Code.

Hiring Practice

The potential employee must submit their resume. Once approved, the employer must deliver a formal job offer in writing, and acquire personal information such as date of birth, marital status, citizenship, NIP (Taxpayer Identification Number), etc

Polish law does not strictly govern the use of civil contracts. They do not receive certain benefits from a company and file taxes independently. He or she is in control of their work method and schedule and is not limited to one client.

The parties are completely free to choose the basis of cooperation from the following:

  • Self-Employed
  • Commission Contrac
  • Contract of Mandate
Tax Filing Documents

The employer must give employees their Personal Income Tax (e.g. PIT-11) form, and the employee should submit documents no later than April 30th to the tax office. The most convenient way of submitting PIT is online via e-Urząd Skarbowy.

The contractor is responsible for submitting their Personal Income Tax (e.g. PIT-37) form to the tax office no later than April 30th.

Payer Tax Filing Requirements

The employer reports all amounts paid during the tax year typically on a PIT-11 form, and gives it to the employee.

The contractor must report on all income earned typically on a PIT form:

  • PIT-36 is for self-employed
  • PIT-37 for incomes from contract of mandate or commission
Other Tax Filing Details

In addition to the PIT forms, employees may also be obliged to submit additional forms, for example, Social Insurance Institution (ZUS). Most tax forms may be submitted electronically online via e-Urząd Skarbowy.

  • Corporate Income Tax (CIT)
  • Value Added Tax (VAT)

In addition to the PIT form, Independent contractors must often submit the following information online via e-Urząd Skarbowy, which includes, but is not limited to:

  • Client contract
  • PESEL number (the national identification number used in Poland)
  • NIP Number (Tax Identification Number)
Remuneration

Earns either an hourly rate or a salary

Invoice-based payments (typically once a month) for contractors under a business entity. Individuals without a business entity may simply receive remuneration via their preferred payment method, but often a payment receipt may be needed.

Worker’s Rights

The Labour Code governs minimum wage, working time standards, the admissible number of overtime hours and work on Sundays and public holidays, annual leave, maternity leave and termination.

Labour laws do not apply to employees performing work on the basis civil contract, and thus cannot be infringed upon by the employer. This does not mean that the parties

Benefits

All employee benefits are paid for and delivered by the employing company.

Freedom of contract allows the both parties to establish their own benefit agreements. Contractors are responsible for their own retirement pension insurance, disability insurance, health insurance, accident insurance, etc.

When Paid

An employee pay period must remain the same unless formally changed. In Poland the payment should fall on, or before, the last business day before it is due.

A contractor sends an invoice, and the employing company is responsible for paying it based on details agreed upon in the contract. Contractors are not paid by payroll in most businesses.

Employee

Employment Laws

Governed by The Polish Labour Code.

Hiring Practice

The potential employee must submit their resume. Once approved, the employer must deliver a formal job offer in writing, and acquire personal information such as date of birth, marital status, citizenship, NIP (Taxpayer Identification Number), etc

Tax Filing Documents

The employer must give employees their Personal Income Tax (e.g. PIT-11) form, and the employee should submit documents no later than April 30th to the tax office. The most convenient way of submitting PIT is online via e-Urząd Skarbowy.

Payer Tax Filing Requirements

The employer reports all amounts paid during the tax year typically on a PIT-11 form, and gives it to the employee.

Other Tax Filing Details

In addition to the PIT forms, employees may also be obliged to submit additional forms, for example, Social Insurance Institution (ZUS). Most tax forms may be submitted electronically online via e-Urząd Skarbowy.

  • Corporate Income Tax (CIT)
  • Value Added Tax (VAT)
Remuneration

Earns either an hourly rate or a salary

Worker’s Rights

The Labour Code governs minimum wage, working time standards, the admissible number of overtime hours and work on Sundays and public holidays, annual leave, maternity leave and termination.

Benefits

All employee benefits are paid for and delivered by the employing company.

When Paid

An employee pay period must remain the same unless formally changed. In Poland the payment should fall on, or before, the last business day before it is due.

Independent Contractor

Employment Laws

Civil law contracts regulated by the Civil Code.

Hiring Practice

Polish law does not strictly govern the use of civil contracts. They do not receive certain benefits from a company and file taxes independently. He or she is in control of their work method and schedule and is not limited to one client.

The parties are completely free to choose the basis of cooperation from the following:

  • Self-Employed
  • Commission Contrac
  • Contract of Mandate
Tax Filing Documents

The contractor is responsible for submitting their Personal Income Tax (e.g. PIT-37) form to the tax office no later than April 30th.

Payer Tax Filing Requirements

The contractor must report on all income earned typically on a PIT form:

  • PIT-36 is for self-employed
  • PIT-37 for incomes from contract of mandate or commission
Other Tax Filing Details

In addition to the PIT form, Independent contractors must often submit the following information online via e-Urząd Skarbowy, which includes, but is not limited to:

  • Client contract
  • PESEL number (the national identification number used in Poland)
  • NIP Number (Tax Identification Number)
Remuneration

Invoice-based payments (typically once a month) for contractors under a business entity. Individuals without a business entity may simply receive remuneration via their preferred payment method, but often a payment receipt may be needed.

Worker’s Rights

Labour laws do not apply to employees performing work on the basis civil contract, and thus cannot be infringed upon by the employer. This does not mean that the parties

Benefits

Freedom of contract allows the both parties to establish their own benefit agreements. Contractors are responsible for their own retirement pension insurance, disability insurance, health insurance, accident insurance, etc.

When Paid

A contractor sends an invoice, and the employing company is responsible for paying it based on details agreed upon in the contract. Contractors are not paid by payroll in most businesses.

WorkSuite Autonomously Classifies Employees vs. Independent Contractors

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Employment In Poland

Foreigners, EU, and non-EU residents can be employed in Poland using the same types of agreements as Polish citizens. The Labor Code governs nearly every labor law in Poland. The standard working week is 40 hours per week and 8 hours per day.

Types of Employment Contracts

There are multiple ways to hire a “worker” as defined by the Labor Code. A “worker” is a person aged 18 or over, typically employed under the basis of the two most common contracts: a full employment contract or a cooperative employment contract. Appointment, election, or government designations are also contract types but far less used. An employment contract can be signed over a trial period (probation), non-fixed term (indefinite), or a fixed term.

Contract Requirements

All employment contracts are concluded in writing and should be signed no later than on the day the employee starts working. In order to be legally binding, employment contracts should be in writing and contain at least the following information:

  • Identification of both parties
  • Type of contract
  • Date of its conclusion
  • Date of commencement (and employment duration for temporary contracts)
  • Workplace
  • Type of work
  • Base salary as well as other compensation or benefits
  • Working hours and annual leave

Working Hours

Defining working hours is flexible and complex in Poland, depending on the type of industry. However, the typical 40-hour workweek and 8-hour day apply to most of the office-based and professional realms in Poland. There are 11 public holidays which reduce working hours by 8, if the holiday does not fall on a Sunday. Since Poland bases its salary on a monthly system, calculating the number of hours worked per month is a very important metric of employment. For example, in September 2020, the number of hours to be worked was 176 (40 hours × 4 weeks) + (8 hours × 2 days), as there were 4 full workweeks and 2 workdays within the month. The full scope of calculating working days and hours can be found on the official government working hours.

Remuneration

Remuneration for full-time employment cannot be lower than the minimum wage set. In 2022, the minimum remuneration is PLN 3010 gross. Most workers will look at the monthly salary figure offered by their employer, considering either Gross or Net values depending upon the contract type. With exceptions, a general rule of thumb is that Full Employment contracts typically offer Gross figures, while Cooperation Contracts operate using Net figures for monthly salaries. This is due to the complexity of European VAT tax laws and Poland’s income tax structure, as well as the payment structures to public healthcare, etc.

Consideration should be taken for remuneration on the topics of Sunday work, night work, overtime, incapacity to work, annual leave, and compensation for expenses, as each of these have special requirements in Poland, which are further detailed on the official gov.pl website.

Bonuses

Any additional bonuses are optional and completely left to the discretion of employers. However, under the Labor Code, employees are entitled to certain additional components of remuneration, for example, an allowance for overtime or night work, which they cannot be deprived of. It is important to formally distinguish additional remuneration structures and bonuses within the written contract.

Probation Period

Probation or trial periods are generally up to the employer, but the standard practice in Poland falls within weeks, up to three months.

Termination and Severance

An employment contract can be terminated only on the grounds listed in the Labor Code:

  1. Settlement agreed by both parties
  2. Unilateral statement with notice period
  3. Unilateral statement without notice period
  4. End of contract term term

Any employment contract can be terminated with the agreement of the parties; at any time and on the initiative of either party; irrespective of the type of contract and possible special duration protection. If a contract is terminated in this way on the employer’s initiative, the employer may sometimes be obliged to pay the employee severance pay (particularly in the case of terminations for reasons for which the employee is not responsible).

The length of the notice period depends on the type of contract and the position held by the employee. During the notice period, the employee is entitled to receive the normal salary under:

  • Employment contract notice periods:
  • Employment contract for a trial period
  • Three working days, if the contract is concluded for not more than two weeks
  • One week, if the contract is concluded for more than two weeks but less than three months
  • Two weeks, if the trial period is three months

Employment contract for a fixed and a non-fixed term

  • Two weeks, if the employee has worked for the employer for not more than six months
  • One month, if the employee has worked for the employer for at least six months but less than three years
  • Three months, if the employee has worked for the employer for at least three years
  • Termination of an indefinite employment contract must have sufficient justification, which must also be cited in a letter of dismissal.

The employer may send the employee on gardening leave to the end of the notice period. In this case, the employee retains the right to remuneration.

In Poland, the notice period for a temporary or permanent employee is dependent on the employee’s length of service as below:

  • 0 – 6 months of service – 2 weeks’ notice
  • 6 months – 3 years of service – 1 month’s notice
  • More than 3 years of service – 3 months’ notice

Paid Leave

All “workers” under employment contracts are entitled to annual paid vacation. An employee will typically receive vacation days with every month that passes (1/12 of the total vacation to which they are entitled after one year of work. An employee gains the right to the next vacation in each subsequent calendar year.

Paid time off is obliged to be offered by the employer, under the following “vacation entitlement” terms:

  • 20 days paid time off – if the employee has been working for less than 10 years
  • 26 days paid time off- if the employee has been working for at least 10 years

Vacation entitlement begins after time spent in education, depending on the type of school finished, for example:

  • basic vocational school – length of course but not more than three years
  • secondary vocational school – length of course but not more than five years
  • secondary school of general education – four years
  • vocational college – six years
  • higher education institution – eight years

The above periods cannot be added together.

Unused annual leave days can be transferred to the following year but must be taken by September 30 of the following year. It is forbidden to pay employees for not taking their leave, except upon termination of employment.

Sick leave:
Employees are entitled to sick leave provided they present a medical certificate before 1 week has passed since their leave. Sick leave is paid at 80%-100% of the allowance basis if the illness occurs during pregnancy or is caused by an accident on the way to or from work. Up to 33 days of sick leave per calendar year, the employer must pay 80% of the salary. From day 34, sickness benefits are paid by the Social Insurance Institution (ZUS).‍

Parental leave:
Parents are entitled to a maternity and paternity benefit paid by the Social Insurance Institution (ZUS). Female employees are entitled to the maternity leave periods linked to the number of children born/adopted as follows:

  • 20 weeks for the birth of one child/adoption of one child
  • 31 weeks for two children,
  • 33 weeks for three children,
  • 35 weeks for four children
  • 37 weeks for five or more children.

Maternity leave:
The Social Insurance Institution covers all maternity pay at 100% of the employee’s regular salary rate. Maternity leave cannot start earlier than six weeks before the due date but can start later or even after birth and continue straight after. Employees should take a minimum of 14 weeks of maternity leave after childbirth before returning to work, and they have the option to transfer any untaken leave beyond 14 weeks to the child’s father. The 33 weeks of maternity leave can be used by both parents and can be divided into no more than 4 periods. Adoption leave may be used by both the adoptive father and the adoptive mother. However, under the Labor Code, the leave can’t be taken simultaneously by both parents.

Paternity leave:
Fathers are entitled to two weeks of paid paternity leave within the first 24 months after the child’s birth or from the date of adoption before the child is seven years old. An employee can take the leave in a maximum of two installments of one week each, and Social Security pays the leave at a rate of 100.00% of the employee’s regular salary.

Other types of Paid Time Off (Leave)
include Disability, Special Events, Military, Childcare, Wedding, Grandchild, and Bereavement, which are further detailed here.

Health Coverage & Insurance

In Poland, healthcare is provided by default to all residents (temporary and permanent) through the National Health Fund (NHF), or Narodowy Fundusz Zdrowia (NFZ). It is mandatory for employees to pay into the public healthcare system (NHF) at a rate of 9% of their salary.

However, many people use a mix of public and private healthcare since public healthcare services can have long waits. As of 2022, it is common for top employers to provide supplementary health insurance to employees as part of their benefits package. This may take the form of a contract made directly with a private healthcare provider or a monthly healthcare allowance paid to the employee. All employees are required to undergo a mandatory health exam prior to starting work, paid for by the employer.

Workers’ Compensation
Employees who sustain work-related injuries or illnesses are entitled to time off if they have a medical certificate that proves incapacity. Employers are required to pay employees 100% of their salary during the first 33 days of incapacity (employees 50 or older, 14 days). Any remaining days are financed through social insurance systems.

Pension
The legal retirement age is 60 for women and 65 for men. Employees and employers share the cost of government pensions by paying 9.76% each of the monthly remunerations. Employers are also required to offer either a pension scheme known as the PPK or a retirement scheme known as the PPE. Employer contributions to the PPK equal 1.5% of the employee’s salary, while contributions to the PPE equal 3.5% of the employee’s salary. Employees are also required to contribute to the PPK or PPE.

Payroll & Taxes

Employers

Taxes

  • 19% Corporate Tax
  • 23% Personal Income Tax
  • No payroll tax

Social Security

Around 21% of employee’s gross salary including:

  • 9.76% National Pension Scheme
  • 6.5% Disability Fund
  • 2.45% Labour Fund
  • 1.67% Accident insurance (for companies employing less than nine people, otherwise between 0.67% and 3.33%)
  • 0.1% Guaranteed Employee Benefit Fund

Employees

Taxes

Individual income rates

  • 17% Up to PLN 85,528
  • 32% Over PLN 85,528
  • 4% Solidarity surcharge on income over PLN 1,000,000

Social Security

Around 23% of employee’s gross salary including:

  • 9.76% National Pension Scheme
  • 9% Health Insurance
  • 2.45% Sickness Insurance
  • 1.5% Disability Fund

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Contractors & Freelancers in Poland

Contractor and Freelancer relationships are not bound by the typical Polish labor laws that govern full-time employment relationships. The key differences to note between employment and non-employed workers are as follows:

  • Identification of both parties
  • Type of contract
  • Date of its conclusion
  • Date of commencement (and employment duration for temporary contracts)
  • Workplace
  • Type of work
  • Base salary as well as other compensation or benefits
  • Working hours and annual leave

Employment vs. Independent Contractors and Freelancers

The distinction between employment and independent contractor is very specific in Poland and has wide-reaching implications for companies looking to hire from abroad. Self-employment is very popular among professionals who have set up their own freelance business entity, who then forge business-to-business (B2B) contracts with their ‘clients’ from abroad. It’s estimated that approximately 20% of all working population in Poland is self-employed.

However, in some cases, this relationship can lead to legal risks, which involve reclassifying the individual to an employee. In practice, if a relationship between the contractor and their client/company proves to be a lawful employment relationship, significant financial penalties may apply. It is, therefore, important to have an employment service partner like Worksuite to ensure that independent contractors fall under the correct working relationship with your business.

While traditional employees fall under Labor Code contracts and protections under Polish labor law, independent contractors typically fall under business-to-business contracts known as civil law agreements.

Civil Law Agreements (B2B Contracts)

Under civil law agreements, “workers” function as contractors or freelancers. The contracts engage workers to perform specific tasks, and they operate outside the labor laws that generally apply to Polish employees. It is critical to always properly distinguish the services provided by a B2B contractor to not establish an employment relationship.

In Poland, criteria specified in the Labor Code are useful for determining whether a worker is a contractor or an employee. The Polish Labor Code stipulates several different criteria that companies should use to differentiate their contractors from their employees. Workers are generally employees rather than contractors if they meet the following criteria:

  • They perform work of a specified type.
  • They accomplish that work under direct employer supervision.
  • They perform work at the place and time the employer dictates.
  • The working relationship is relatively continuous.

On the other hand, workers who perform their jobs with minimal direct employer supervision, choose when and where they work, and take on a series of short-term projects of their choice are more likely to be classified as contractors.

Contractor Payment

Payment to freelancers and independent contractors is extremely flexible and can simply be determined by both parties within the contract. There are no laws in Poland that require a specific payment method or time of delivery—although the typical window from the contractor sending an invoice to payment falls within 14 days of issuance.

When working with independent contractors, you’ll need to have an established process for paying them correctly and on time within the contract.

Contracting Models

There are several contracting models for working with independent contractors in Poland.

Working with a hiring partner

If you work with a hiring partner, you often streamline your contractor payment processes significantly. A dependable partner can help you hire your contractors legally and pay them quickly, accurately, in the local currency, and in a way that complies with Polish regulations.

Contract of Mandate (Umowa Zlecenia)

Umowa Zlecenia differs from service agreements and B2B contracts, acting more as an employment contract but with fewer obligations for the employer. Employers should consider it as an informal employment relationship, where the working role, location, hours, and commitment are well established, and the employer has more supervision over the worker

Contract for Specific Work (Umowa o dzieło)

Umowa o dzieło is a contract made for workers who have a specialized role or professional activity that cannot be easily performed by many other individuals. Employers can think of this as a project-based contract, where a mutual agreement is formed between a company and a worker under fixed scope and time. Note that consecutive contracts for Umowa o dzieło must be unique—a worker cannot end Umowa o dzieło and begin the same work for the same project again.

 

Contractor Taxes

Most independent contractors are responsible for contributing to ZUS individually. Employers are not responsible for withholding any payroll taxes or contributing on the workers behalf to ZUS—the employing company only pays what is shown in the service agreement when hiring independent contractors. Insurance typically covers the same realms as employment, including retirement pensions, disability, health and workplace injury. Health insurance payment plans are reserved for the contractor. Students under 26 are not required to pay into compulsory social or health insurance funds.

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Visas & Work Permits in Poland

Non-EU residents must first obtain a work permit to be employed or hired as a contractor in Poland. Residents within the European Union can be employed freely without a work permit. The work permit is only applicable to the job at the time of application, and a new application will need to be acquired should the employee change job. A work permit is valid for three years.

Poland has five types of work visas, with type A being the most common of all

  • Type A Eligible for employees or independent contractors who enter a contract with an employer with a registered office in Poland. Most permits fall under this type.
  • Type B Eligible for board members who will reside in Poland for a total period that exceeds six months, within a 12-month time period.
  • Type C Eligible when foreign employees are sent to Poland by a foreign employer for more than 30 days in a calendar year to work for the foreign employer’s subsidiary or branch office in the country.
  • Type D Eligible when foreign employers send workers for export/import services temporarily. The foreign employer must not have a subsidiary of its own in Poland.
  • Type E Eligible when the work-related tasks do not fall into any of the above four categories.

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Payment processing to Poland

IMPORTANT: Tax office requirements on invoices in Poland can vary widely depending upon the type of work, services rendered, industry, country-level agreements, and so on.

For example, sometimes Value Added Tax (VAT) may be removed based on country-level agreements. At other times, specific items or wording will be required on an invoice. A global employment organization like Worksuite can help you navigate the complex tax challenges in Poland, as well as payment processes within the country.

Employers should obtain basic information from employees or independent contractors in Poland before initiating payment procedures, most of which should be detailed in the contract or service agreement beforehand. Other data fields will depend upon the employee or contractor working agreement:

Required Data

  • Name
  • Date of Birth
  • Residential Address
  • Telephone
  • NIP Number (NIP is a tax identification number)

Optional Data

  • PESEL is the national identification number used in Poland since 1979. The number is 11 digits long, identifies exactly one person, and cannot be changed once assigned, except in specific situations.
  • Passport Number or Residency Card may be required for workers staying in Poland on a visa or those with temporary diplomatic duties.

Payment Processing for Employees

Employee salaries are most commonly distributed via Electronic Payments as bank to bank transfers using the information presented in the table below. Smaller employers with only a handful of employees in Poland may opt to use cash or money transfer instead, with cheques being the least popular option of all.

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